English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

HLA concordance between hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients and umbilical cord blood units: Implications for cord blood banking in admixed populations

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons214002

Barquera Lozano,  Rodrigo José
Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons202721

Clayton,  Stephen
Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons225342

Hernández-Zaragoza,  Diana I.
Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Bravo-Acevedo, A., Barquera Lozano, R. J., Bekker-Méndez, C., Clayton, S., Hernández-Zaragoza, D. I., Benítez-Arvizu, G., et al. (2019). HLA concordance between hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients and umbilical cord blood units: Implications for cord blood banking in admixed populations. Human Immunology, 80(9), 714-722. doi:10.1016/j.humimm.2019.05.002.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-2F47-6
Abstract
Umbilical cord blood stem cell transplantation is an important choice for treating a variety of hematopoietic, neoplastic, and genetic disorders. The optimal size for a cord blood bank to provide matching units for 80 of patients requiring a stem cell transplantation procedure depends on the particular characteristics of each population. In this study, we analyzed the immunogenetic diversity of a sample set of Mexican patients suffering from blood, hematopoietic, and immunological diseases, to assess the best strategy for cord blood banking. For achieving that, we analyzed HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1, and HLA-DQB1 genotype and allele frequencies of both units from the bioarchive of the Umbilical Cord Blood Bank from La Raza and patients requiring a stem cell transplant and compared these variables with data from the same geographic and genetic context. We were able to detect significant differences for at least half of the alleles were observed for HLA class I and class II genes between units and patients. Five Native American haplotypes had lower frequencies in patients sample than in the cord blood units. Genetic admixture estimations for both groups showed a higher contribution of Native American component in the cord blood units. Differences in ancestral components in the Umbilical Cord Blood Bank from La Raza and six virtual banks modeled from a pool of Mexican mixed ancestry individuals show that genetic background is important in cord blood collection. In conclusion, increasing diversity over quantity of new cord blood units will improve the cost effectiveness of cord blood banking and health policies regarding hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in admixed populations such as those present in Latin American countries.