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Optical manipulation of domains in chiral topological superconductors

MPS-Authors
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Yu,  T.
Theoretical Description of Pump-Probe Spectroscopies in Solids, Theory Department, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;

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Kennes,  D. M.
Theory Group, Theory Department, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;
Institut für Theorie der Statistischen Physik, RWTH Aachen;

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Sentef,  M. A.
Theoretical Description of Pump-Probe Spectroscopies in Solids, Theory Department, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;

Fulltext (public)

PhysRevResearch.3.013253.pdf
(Publisher version), 2MB

Supplementary Material (public)
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Citation

Yu, T., Claassen, M., Kennes, D. M., & Sentef, M. A. (2021). Optical manipulation of domains in chiral topological superconductors. Physical Review Research, 3(1): 013253. doi:10.1103/PhysRevResearch.3.013253.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-3249-F
Abstract
Optical control of chirality in chiral superconductors bears potential for future topological quantum computing applications. When a chiral domain is written and erased by a laser spot, the Majorana modes around the domain can be manipulated on ultrafast timescales. Here we study topological superconductors with two chiral order parameters coupled via light fields by a time-dependent real-space Ginzburg-Landau approach. Continuous optical driving, or the application of supercurrent, hybridizes the two chiral order parameters, allowing one to induce and control the superconducting state beyond what is possible in equilibrium. We show that superconductivity can even be enhanced if the mutual coupling between two order parameters is sufficiently strong. Furthermore, we demonstrate that short optical pulses with spot size larger than a critical one can overcome a counteracting diffusion effect and write, erase, or move chiral domains. Surprisingly, these domains are found to be stable, which might enable optically programmable quantum computers in the future.