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Modern X-ray spectroscopy: XAS and XES in the laboratory

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Peredkov,  Sergey
Research Department DeBeer, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion, Max Planck Society;

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DeBeer,  Serena
Research Department DeBeer, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Zimmermann, P., Peredkov, S., Abdala, P. M., DeBeer, S., Tromp, M., Müller, C., et al. (2020). Modern X-ray spectroscopy: XAS and XES in the laboratory. Coordination Chemistry Reviews, 423: 213466, pp. 1-28. doi:10.1016/j.ccr.2020.213466.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-D52D-7
Abstract
X-ray spectroscopy is an important tool for scientific analysis. While the earliest demonstration experiments were realised in the laboratory, with the advent of synchrotron light sources most of the experiments shifted to large scale synchrotron facilities. In the recent past there is an increased interest to perform X-ray experiments also with in-house laboratory sources, to simplify access to X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopy, in particular for routine measurements. Here we summarise the recent developments and comment on the most representative example experiments in the field of in-house laboratory X-ray spectroscopy. We first give an introduction and some historic background on X-ray spectroscopy. This is followed by an overview of the detection techniques used for X-ray absorption and X-ray emission measurements. A short paragraph also puts related high energy resolution and resonant techniques into context, though they are not yet feasible in the laboratory. At the end of this section the opportunities using wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in the laboratory are discussed. Then we summarise the relevant details of the recent experimental laboratory setups split into two separate sections, one for the recent von Hamos setups, and one for the recent Johann/Johansson type setups. Following that, focussing on chemistry and catalysis, we then summarise some of the notable X-ray absorption and X-ray emission experiments and the results accomplished with in-house setups. In a third part we then discuss some applications of laboratory X-ray spectroscopy with a particular focus on chemistry and catalysis. (C) 2020 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.