English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Lignin Precipitation and Fractionation from OrganoCat Pulping to Obtain Lignin with Different Sizes and Chemical Composition

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons58749

Leitner,  Walter
Research Department Leitner, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion, Max Planck Society;
Institut für Technische Chemie und Makromolekulare Chemie, Rheinisch‐Westfälische Technische Hochschule Aachen, Worringer Weg 1, 52074 Aachen, Germany;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Weidener, D., Holtz, A., Klose, H., Jupke, A., Leitner, W., & Grande, P. M. (2020). Lignin Precipitation and Fractionation from OrganoCat Pulping to Obtain Lignin with Different Sizes and Chemical Composition. Molecules, 25(15): 3330. doi:10.3390/molecules25153330.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-D50C-C
Abstract
Fractionation of lignocellulose into its three main components, lignin, hemicelluloses, and cellulose, is a common approach in modern biorefinery concepts. Whereas the valorization of hemicelluloses and cellulose sugars has been widely discussed in literature, lignin utilization is still challenging. Due to its high heterogeneity and complexity, as well as impurities from pulping, it is a challenging feedstock. However, being the most abundant source of renewable aromatics, it remains a promising resource. This work describes a fractionation procedure that aims at stepwise precipitating beech wood (Fagus sp.) lignin obtained with OrganoCat technology from a 2-methyltetrahydrofuran solution, usingn-hexane andn-pentane as antisolvents. By consecutive antisolvent precipitation and filtration, lignin is fractionated and then characterized to elucidate the structure of the different fractions. This way, more defined and purified lignin fractions can be obtained. Narrowing down the complexity of lignin and separately valorizing the fractions might further increase the economic viability of biorefineries.