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Journal Article

Common structuring principles of the Drosophila melanogaster microbiome on a continental scale and between host and substrate

MPS-Authors

Wang,  Yun
Department Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Künzel,  Sven
Department Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Wang, Y., Kapun, M., Waidele, L., Künzel, S., Bergland, A. O., & Staubach, F. (2020). Common structuring principles of the Drosophila melanogaster microbiome on a continental scale and between host and substrate. Environmental Microbiology Reports, 12(2), 220-228. doi:10.1111/1758-2229.12826.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-3385-9
Abstract
Summary The relative importance of host control, environmental effects and stochasticity in the assemblage of host-associated microbiomes is being debated. We analysed the microbiome among fly populations that were sampled across Europe by the European Drosophila Population Genomics Consortium (DrosEU). In order to better understand the structuring principles of the natural D. melanogaster microbiome, we combined environmental data on climate and food-substrate with dense genomic data on host populations and microbiome profiling. Food-substrate, temperature, and host population structure correlated with microbiome structure. Microbes, whose abundance was co-structured with host populations, also differed in abundance between flies and their substrate in an independent survey. This finding suggests common, host-related structuring principles of the microbiome on different spatial scales.