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Evolution of NO3 reactivity during the oxidation of isoprene

MPS-Authors
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Dewald,  Patrick
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Liebmann,  Jonathan M.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Friedrich,  Nils
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Shenolikar,  Justin
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Schuladen,  Jan
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Lelieveld,  Jos
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Crowley,  John N.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Dewald, P., Liebmann, J. M., Friedrich, N., Shenolikar, J., Schuladen, J., Rohrer, F., et al. (2020). Evolution of NO3 reactivity during the oxidation of isoprene. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 20(17), 10459-10475. doi:10.5194/acp-20-10459-2020.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-5A3B-3
Abstract
In a series of experiments in an atmospheric simulation chamber (SAPHIR,1 Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany), NO3 reactivity (kNO3) resulting from the reaction of NO3 with isoprene and stable trace gases formed as products was measured directly using a flow tube reactor coupled to a cavity ring-down spectrometer (FT-CRDS). The experiments were carried out in both dry and humid air with variation of the initial mixing ratios of ozone (50–100 ppbv), isoprene (3–22 ppbv) and NO2 (5–30 ppbv). kNO3 was in excellent agreement with values calculated from the isoprene mixing ratio and the rate coefficient for the reaction of NO3 with isoprene. This result serves to confirm that the FT-CRDS returns accurate values of kNO3 even at elevated NO2 concentrations and to show that reactions of NO3 with stable reaction products like non-radical organic nitrates do not contribute significantly to NO3 reactivity during the oxidation of isoprene. A comparison of kNO3 with NO3 reactivities calculated from NO3 mixing ratios and NO3 production rates suggests that organic peroxy radicals and HO2 account for ∼50 % of NO3 losses. This contradicts predictions based on numerical simulations using the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM version 3.3.1) unless the rate coefficient for reaction between NO3 and isoprene-derived RO2 is roughly doubled to ∼5×10−12 cm3 molecule−1 s−1.