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Does the Intra-Arctic Modification of Long-Range Transported Aerosol Affect the Local Radiative Budget? (A Case Study)

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Eppers,  Oliver
Particle Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Nakoudi, K., Ritter, C., Boeckmann, C., Kunkel, D., Eppers, O., Rozanov, V., et al. (2020). Does the Intra-Arctic Modification of Long-Range Transported Aerosol Affect the Local Radiative Budget? (A Case Study). Remote Sensing, 12(13): 2112. doi:10.3390/rs12132112.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-4F52-5
Abstract
The impact of aerosol spatio-temporal variability on the Arctic radiative budget is not fully constrained. This case study focuses on the intra-Arctic modification of long-range transported aerosol and its direct aerosol radiative effect (ARE). Different types of air-borne and ground-based remote sensing observations (from Lidar and sun-photometer) revealed a high tropospheric aerosol transport episode over two parts of the European Arctic in April 2018. By incorporating the derived aerosol optical and microphysical properties into a radiative transfer model, we assessed the ARE over the two locations. Our study displayed that even in neighboring Arctic upper tropospheric levels, aged aerosol was transformed due to the interplay of removal processes (nucleation scavenging and dry deposition) and alteration of the aerosol source regions (northeast Asia and north Europe). Along the intra-Arctic transport, the coarse aerosol mode was depleted and the visible wavelength Lidar ratio (LR) increased significantly (from 15 to 64–82 sr). However, the aerosol modifications were not reflected on the ARE. More specifically, the short-wave (SW) atmospheric column ARE amounted to +4.4 - +4.9 W m−2 over the ice-covered Fram Strait and +4.5 W m−2 over the snow-covered Ny-Ålesund. Over both locations, top-of-atmosphere (TOA) warming was accompanied by surface cooling. These similarities can be attributed to the predominant accumulation mode, which drives the SW radiative budget, as well as to the similar layer altitude, solar geometry, and surface albedo conditions over both locations. However, in the context of retreating sea ice, the ARE may change even along individual transport episodes due to the ice albedo feedback.