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The Red Sea Deep Water is a potent source of atmospheric ethane and propane

MPS-Authors
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Bourtsoukidis,  E.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons101196

Pozzer,  A.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons60810

Sattler,  T.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Ernle,  L.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Edtbauer,  A.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Fischer,  H
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Osipov,  S.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons207351

Pfannerstill,  E. Y.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons195368

Stönner,  C.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons192706

Tadic,  I.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Walter,  D.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons239555

Wang,  N.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Lelieveld,  J.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Williams,  J.
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Bourtsoukidis, E., Pozzer, A., Sattler, T., Matthaios, V. N., Ernle, L., Edtbauer, A., et al. (2020). The Red Sea Deep Water is a potent source of atmospheric ethane and propane. Nature Communications, 11(1): 447. doi:10.1038/s41467-020-14375-0.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-4B0B-A
Abstract
Non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) such as ethane and propane are significant atmospheric pollutants and precursors of tropospheric ozone, while the Middle East is a global emission hotspot due to extensive oil and gas production. Here we compare in situ hydrocarbon measurements, performed around the Arabian Peninsula, with global model simulations that include current emission inventories (EDGAR) and state-of-the-art atmospheric circulation and chemistry mechanisms (EMAC model). While measurements of high mixing ratios over the Arabian Gulf are adequately simulated, strong underprediction by the model was found over the northern Red Sea. By examining the individual sources in the model and by utilizing air mass back-trajectory investigations and Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis, we deduce that Red Sea Deep Water (RSDW) is an unexpected, potent source of atmospheric NMHCs. This overlooked underwater source is comparable with total anthropogenic emissions from entire Middle Eastern countries, and significantly impacts the regional atmospheric chemistry.