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Black and white fused silica: modified sol-gel process combined with moth-eye structuring for highly absorbing and diffuse reflecting SiO2 glass

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Hirte,  Johannes
Cellular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Diao,  Zhaolu
Cellular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Weishaupt,  Klaus
Cellular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Spatz,  Joachim P.
Cellular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Brunner, R., Kraus, M., Hirte, J., Diao, Z., Weishaupt, K., Spatz, J. P., et al. (2020). Black and white fused silica: modified sol-gel process combined with moth-eye structuring for highly absorbing and diffuse reflecting SiO2 glass. Optics Express, 28(22), 32499-32516. doi:10.1364/OE.406150.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-4BA3-D
Abstract
Diffuse reflecting (white) and highly absorbing (black) fused silica based materials are presented, which combine volume modified substrates and surfaces equipped with anti-reflective moth-eye-structures. For diffuse reflection, micrometer sized cavities are created in bulk fused silica during a sol-gel process. In contrast, carbon black particles are added to get the highly absorbing material. The moth-eye-structures are prepared by block copolymer micelle nanolithography (BCML), followed by a reactive-ion-etching (RIE) step. The moth-eye-structures drastically reduce the specular reflectance on both diffuse reflecting and highly absorbing samples across a wide spectral range from 250 nm to 2500 nm and for varying incidence angles. The adjustment of the height of the moth-eye-structures allows us to select the spectral position of the specular reflectance minimum, which measures less than 0.1%. Diffuse Lambertian-like scattering and absorbance appear nearly uniform across the selected spectral range, showing a slight decrease with increasing wavelength.