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Mutations in the Ca2+ binding site of the Paracoccus denitrificans cytochrome c oxidase

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Harrenga,  Axel
Department of Molecular Membrane Biology, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max Planck Society;

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Michel,  Hartmut
Department of Molecular Membrane Biology, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Pfitzner, U., Kirichenko, A., Konstantinov, A. A., Mertens, M., Wittershagen, A., Kolbesen, B. O., et al. (1999). Mutations in the Ca2+ binding site of the Paracoccus denitrificans cytochrome c oxidase. FEBS Letters, 456(3), 365-369. doi:10.1016/s0014-5793(99)00977-1.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-4C3D-1
Abstract
Recent structure determinations suggested a new binding site for a non-redox active metal ion in subunit I of cytochrome c oxidase both of mitochondrial and of bacterial origin. We analyzed the relevant metal composition of the bovine and the Paracoccus denitrificans enzyme and of bacterial site-directed mutants in several residues presumably liganding this ion. Unlike the mitochondrial enzyme where a low, substoichiometric content of Ca2+ was found, the bacterial wild-type (WT) oxidase showed a stoichiometry of one Ca per enzyme monomer. Mutants in Asp-477 (in immediate vicinity of this site) were clearly diminished in their Ca content and the isolated mutant enzyme revealed a spectral shift in the heme a visible absorption upon Ca addition, which was reversed by Na ions. This spectral behavior, largely comparable to that of the mitochondrial enzyme, was not observed for the bacterial WT oxidase. Further structure refinement revealed a tightly bound water molecule as an additional Ca2+ ligand.