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Highly porous free-standing rGO/SnO2 pseudocapacitive cathodes for high-rate and long-cycling Al-Ion batteries

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Jahnke,  Timotheus
Cellular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Hotz,  Daniel
Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Jahnke, T., Raafat, L., Hotz, D., Knöller, A., Diem, A. M., Bill, J., et al. (2020). Highly porous free-standing rGO/SnO2 pseudocapacitive cathodes for high-rate and long-cycling Al-Ion batteries. Nanomaterials, 10(10): 2024, pp. 1-17. doi:10.3390/nano10102024.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-4CE6-1
Abstract
Establishing energy storage systems beyond conventional lithium ion batteries requires the development of novel types of electrode materials. Such materials should be capable of accommodating ion species other than Li+, and ideally, these ion species should be of multivalent nature, such as Al3+. Along this line, we introduce a highly porous aerogel cathode composed of reduced graphene oxide, which is loaded with nanostructured SnO2. This binder-free hybrid not only exhibits an outstanding mechanical performance, but also unites the pseudocapacity of the reduced graphene oxide and the electrochemical storage capacity of the SnO2 nanoplatelets. Moreover, the combination of both materials gives rise to additional intercalation sites at their interface, further contributing to the total capacity of up to 16 mAh cm−3 at a charging rate of 2 C. The high porosity (99.9%) of the hybrid and the synergy of its components yield a cathode material for high-rate (up to 20 C) aluminum ion batteries, which exhibit an excellent cycling stability over 10,000 tested cycles. The electrode design proposed here has a great potential to meet future energy and power density demands for advanced energy storage devices.