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Hybrid sideways/longitudinal swimming in the monoflagellate Shewanella oneidensis: from aerotactic band to biofilm

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Guido,  Isabella
Laboratory for Fluid Physics, Pattern Formation and Biocomplexity, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society;

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Breithaupt,  Thomas
Group Non-equilibrium soft matter, Department of Dynamics of Complex Fluids, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society;

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Mazza,  Marco
Group Non-equilibrium soft matter, Department of Dynamics of Complex Fluids, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Stricker, L., Guido, I., Breithaupt, T., Mazza, M., & Vollmer, J. (2020). Hybrid sideways/longitudinal swimming in the monoflagellate Shewanella oneidensis: from aerotactic band to biofilm. Journal of The Royal Society Interface, 17: 20200559. doi:10.1098/rsif.2020.0559.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-517D-2
Abstract
Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are facultative aerobic electroactive bacteria with an appealing potential for sustainable energy production and bioremediation. They gather around air sources, forming aerotactic bands and biofilms. Here, we experimentally follow the evolution of the band around an air bubble, and we find good agreement with the numerical solutions of the pertinent transport equations. Video microscopy reveals a transition between motile and non-motile MR-1 upon oxygen depletion, preventing further development of the biofilm. We discover that MR-1 can alternate between longitudinal fast and sideways slow swimming. The resulting bimodal velocity distributions change in response to different oxygen concentrations and gradients, supporting the biological functions of aerotaxis and confinement.