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Responsive drop method : quantitative in-situ determination of surfactant effectiveness using reconfigurable Janus emulsions

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Djalali,  Saveh
Lukas Zeininger, Kolloidchemie, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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Frank,  Bradley D.
Lukas Zeininger, Kolloidchemie, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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Zeininger,  Lukas
Lukas Zeininger, Kolloidchemie, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Djalali, S., Frank, B. D., & Zeininger, L. (2020). Responsive drop method: quantitative in-situ determination of surfactant effectiveness using reconfigurable Janus emulsions. Soft Matter, 16(46), 10419-10424. doi:10.1039/D0SM01724H.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-51A0-8
Abstract
Characterization of surfactant effectiveness and thus an evaluation of their performance in a wide range of emulsion technologies requires a precise determination of key parameters including their critical micelle concentrations as well as their ability to lower the surface tension at interfaces. In this study, we describe a new approach to quantify marginal variations in interfacial tension of surfactant stabilized fluid interfaces. The method is based on a unique chemical-morphological coupling inside bi-phasic oil-in-water Janus emulsions that undergo dynamic morphological transitions in response to changes in the surfactant type, concentration, ratio, and configuration. Variations in Janus droplet morphologies are readily monitored in-situ using a simple side-view imaging setup, resulting in a fast, convenient, cost-effective, time-, and sample-saving technique for the characterization of classical surfactant systems. In addition, the reported method facilitates a monitoring of triggered changes in surfactant effectiveness, e.g. invoked by external triggers, and thus proves particularly useful for the in-situ analysis of stimuli-responsive surfactants and emulsions.