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Sex-specific effects of cooperative breeding and colonial nesting on prosociality in corvids

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Schiestl,  Martina
Linguistic and Cultural Evolution, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Horn, L., Bugnyar, T., Griesser, M., Hengl, M., Izawa, E.-I., Oortwijn, T., et al. (2020). Sex-specific effects of cooperative breeding and colonial nesting on prosociality in corvids. eLife, 9: e58139. doi:10.7554/eLife.58139.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-5528-D
Abstract
The investigation of prosocial behavior is of particular interest from an evolutionary perspective. Comparisons of prosociality across non-human animal species have, however, so far largely focused on primates, and their interpretation is hampered by the diversity of paradigms and procedures used. Here, we present the first systematic comparison of prosocial behavior across multiple species in a taxonomic group outside the primate order, namely the bird family Corvidae. We measured prosociality in eight corvid species, which vary in the expression of cooperative breeding and colonial nesting. We show that cooperative breeding is positively associated with prosocial behavior across species. Also, colonial nesting is associated with a stronger propensity for prosocial behavior, but only in males. The combined results of our study strongly suggest that both cooperative breeding and colonial nesting, which may both rely on heightened social tolerance at the nest, are likely evolutionary pathways to prosocial behavior in corvids.