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Evolution of pallium, hippocampus, and cortical cell types revealed by single-cell transcriptomics in reptiles

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Tosches,  Maria Antoniette
Neural systems Department, Max Planck Institute for Brain Research, Max Planck Society;

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Yamawaki,  Tracy
Neural systems Department, Max Planck Institute for Brain Research, Max Planck Society;

Naumann,  Robert K.
Neural systems Department, Max Planck Institute for Brain Research, Max Planck Society;

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Tushev,  Georgi
Synaptic Plasticity Department, Max Planck Institute for Brain Research, Max Planck Society;

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Laurent,  Gilles
Neural systems Department, Max Planck Institute for Brain Research, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Tosches, M. A., Yamawaki, T., Naumann, R. K., Jacobi, A. A., Tushev, G., & Laurent, G. (2019). Evolution of pallium, hippocampus, and cortical cell types revealed by single-cell transcriptomics in reptiles. Science, 360(6391), 881-888. doi:10.1126/science.aar4237.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-E062-D
Abstract
Computations in the mammalian cortex are carried out by glutamatergic and γ-aminobutyric acid–releasing (GABAergic) neurons forming specialized circuits and areas. Here we asked how these neurons and areas evolved in amniotes. We built a gene expression atlas of the pallium of two reptilian species using large-scale single-cell messenger RNA sequencing. The transcriptomic signature of glutamatergic neurons in reptilian cortex suggests that mammalian neocortical layers are made of new cell types generated by diversification of ancestral gene-regulatory programs. By contrast, the diversity of reptilian cortical GABAergic neurons indicates that the interneuron classes known in mammals already existed in the common ancestor of all amniotes.