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Surface Action Spectroscopy: A review and a Perspective on a New Technique to Study Vibrations at Surfaces

MPS-Authors
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Liu,  Yun
Chemical Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Wu,  Zongfang
Chemical Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;
Material Physics, School of Engineering Sciences, KTH Royal Institute of Technology;

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Kuhlenbeck,  Helmut
Chemical Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Freund,  Hans-Joachim
Chemical Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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tcr.202000111.pdf
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Citation

Liu, Y., Wu, Z., Kuhlenbeck, H., & Freund, H.-J. (2020). Surface Action Spectroscopy: A review and a Perspective on a New Technique to Study Vibrations at Surfaces. The Chemical Record, 20. doi:10.1002/tcr.202000111.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-5DF1-1
Abstract
A new vibrational spectroscopy method aimed at the investigation of solid surfaces in ultrahigh vacuum, called “Surface Action Spectroscopy (SAS)”, is described and the first results are reviewed. This technique is based on ideas and experiments performed in the gas phase. A surface is exposed to a messenger species at low temperature. This messenger species is desorbed via absorption of tunable infrared light from a free‐electron laser and the desorption rate of the messenger species is recorded via mass spectrometry. It is shown that the technique is extremely surface sensitive and we discuss the basic mechanisms of the technique. We show a feasibility study on a V2O3(0001) surface, where we know the surface structure. We then proceed to the example of iron oxide films to study the surface structure in parallel with calculations of the surface phonons, which allow us to confirm the surface structure of Fe3O4(111) to be Fetet terminated. It also provides evidence for the so‐called biphase structure. To conclude, we discuss possibilities to apply the technique to interesting questions in model and real catalysis, since the technique may provide interesting information independent of long‐range order of the sample.