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Journal Article

Do we predict upcoming speech content in naturalistic environments?

MPS-Authors
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Heyselaar,  Evelien
Neurobiology of Language Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society, Nijmegen, NL;
Radboud University Nijmegen, External Organizations;

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Peeters,  David
Neurobiology of Language Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society, Nijmegen, NL;
Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, External Organizations;
Tilburg University;

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Hagoort,  Peter
Neurobiology of Language Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society, Nijmegen, NL;
Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, External Organizations;

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Supplementary Material (public)

plcp_a_1859568_sm1317.docx
(Supplementary material), 36KB

plcp_a_1859568_sm1318.pdf
(Supplementary material), 135KB

plcp_a_1859568_sm1319.docx
(Supplementary material), 16KB

Citation

Heyselaar, E., Peeters, D., & Hagoort, P. (2020). Do we predict upcoming speech content in naturalistic environments? Language, Cognition and Neuroscience. Advance online publication. doi:10.1080/23273798.2020.1859568.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-60C8-B
Abstract
The ability to predict upcoming actions is a hallmark of cognition. It remains unclear, however, whether the predictive behaviour observed in controlled lab environments generalises to rich, everyday settings. In four virtual reality experiments, we tested whether a well-established marker of linguistic prediction (anticipatory eye movements) replicated when increasing the naturalness of the paradigm by means of immersing participants in naturalistic scenes (Experiment 1), increasing the number of distractor objects (Experiment 2), modifying the proportion of predictable noun-referents (Experiment 3), and manipulating the location of referents relative to the joint attentional space (Experiment 4). Robust anticipatory eye movements were observed for Experiments 1–3. The anticipatory effect disappeared, however, in Experiment 4. Our findings suggest that predictive processing occurs in everyday communication if the referents are situated in the joint attentional space. Methodologically, our study confirms that ecological validity and experimental control may go hand-in-hand in the study of human predictive behaviour.