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Electron Microscopy Structural Characterisation of Nano‐Materials: Image Simulation and Image Processing

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Sack-Kongehl,  Hilde
Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Urban,  Joachim
Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Nihoul, G., Sack-Kongehl, H., & Urban, J. (1998). Electron Microscopy Structural Characterisation of Nano‐Materials: Image Simulation and Image Processing. Crystal Research and Technology, 33(7-8), 1025-1037. doi:10.1002/(SICI)1521-4079(199810)33:7/8<1025:AID-CRAT1025>3.0.CO;2-M.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-68AA-5
Abstract
High resolution electron microscopy is now often used to determine the structure of nano‐materials: very small clusters, multilayers, precipitates etc. The images are often poor, because of the small size of the object, and their complete interpretation is very difficult. Image simulation has to be done in order to obtain a correct interpretation of these experimental images. This simulation is usually done using the multislice theory: however, a cluster or an atomic layer cannot be considered as a 3D‐periodical object, though it is sort of crystallised. Periodisation has already been applied to non periodical structures as defects, interfaces etc in crystallised matter but nano‐samples are different objects as they have only a small and deformed crystalline component. Image processing can then help to interpret the images if one is conscious of all the bugs which can be introduced in the process! In this paper, we want to forewarn newcomers in the field of HREM imaging for nano‐clusters and explain some of the problems linked with simulating and processing nano‐samples, insisting on all the wrong results which can be obtained by applying all the possible logicals which can be bought.