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Determining the radial distribution function of water using electron scattering: A key to solution phase chemistry

MPS-Authors

de Kock,  M. B.
Miller Group, Atomically Resolved Dynamics Department, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;

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Azim,  S.
Miller Group, Atomically Resolved Dynamics Department, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;
International Max Planck Research School for Ultrafast Imaging & Structural Dynamics (IMPRS-UFAST), Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;

Kassier,  G.
Miller Group, Atomically Resolved Dynamics Department, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;

External Ressource
Fulltext (public)

5.0024127.pdf
(Publisher version), 2MB

Supplementary Material (public)

suppl.zip
(Supplementary material), 53KB

Citation

de Kock, M. B., Azim, S., Kassier, G., & Miller, R. J. D. (2020). Determining the radial distribution function of water using electron scattering: A key to solution phase chemistry. The Journal of Chemical Physics, 153(19): 194504. doi:10.1063/5.0024127.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-6FC4-0
Abstract
High energy electron scattering of liquid water (H2O) at near-ambient temperature and pressure was performed in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) to determine the radial distribution of water, which provides information on intra- and intermolecular spatial correlations. A recently developed environmental liquid cell enables formation of a stable water layer, the thickness of which is readily controlled by pressure and flow rate adjustments of a humid air stream passing between two silicon nitride (Si3N4) membranes. The analysis of the scattering data is adapted from the x-ray methodology to account for multiple scattering in the H2O:Si3N4 sandwich layer. For the H2O layer, we obtain oxygen–oxygen (O–O) and oxygen–hydrogen (O–H) peaks at 2.84 Å and 1.83 Å, respectively, in good agreement with values in the literature. This demonstrates the potential of our approach toward future studies of water-based physics and chemistry in TEMs or electron probes of structural dynamics.