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Journal Article

Dynamic Imaging of Nanostructures in an Electrolyte with a Scanning Electron Microscope

MPS-Authors
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Yoon,  Aram
Interface Science, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Herzog,  Antonia
Interface Science, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Grosse,  Philipp
Interface Science, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Chee,  See Wee
Interface Science, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Roldan Cuenya,  Beatriz
Interface Science, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Yoon, A., Herzog, A., Grosse, P., Alsem, D. H., Chee, S. W., & Roldan Cuenya, B. (2021). Dynamic Imaging of Nanostructures in an Electrolyte with a Scanning Electron Microscope. Microscopy and Microanalysis. doi:10.1017/S1431927620024769.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-75D4-6
Abstract
The development of microfabricated liquid cells has enabled dynamic studies of nanostructures within a liquid environment with electron microscopy.While such setups are most commonly found in transmission electron microscope (TEM) holders, their implementation in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) offers intriguing potential for multi-modal studies where the large chamber volume allows for the integration of multiple detectors. Here, we describe an electrochemical liquid cell SEM platform that employs the same cells enclosed by silicon nitride membrane windows found in liquid cell TEM holders and demonstrate the imaging of copper oxide nanoparticles in solution using both backscattered and transmitted electrons. In particular, the transmitted electron images collected at high scattering angles show contrast inversion at liquid layer thicknesses of several hundred nanometers, which can be used to determine the presence of liquid in the cell, while maintaining enough resolution to image nanoparticles that are tens of nanometers in size. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we show that both imaging