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Oxygen and carbon stable isotope records of the Lochkovian-Pragian boundary interval from the Prague Basin (Lower Devonian, Czech Republic)

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Vonhof,  Hubert
Climate Geochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Weinerová, H., Bábek, O., Slavik, L., Vonhof, H., & Hladil, J. H. (2020). Oxygen and carbon stable isotope records of the Lochkovian-Pragian boundary interval from the Prague Basin (Lower Devonian, Czech Republic). Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 560: 110036. doi:10.1016/j.palaeo.2020.110036.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-7974-F
Abstract
Climate changes close to the Lochkovian-Pragian Event are still widely discussed. Carbonate δ18O and δ13C and conodont apatite δ18O from medial to distal carbonate ramp sediments were analysed to provide further stable isotope data from the stratotype area in the Prague Basin. The uppermost Silurian to lower Emsian δ18O trends are put into an updated conodont biostratigraphy framework. Carbonate δ18O and δ13C are discussed in the context of facies-dependent diagenesis. The δ13C pattern measured from different sections enables the correlation of intervals with development of different facies inside the Prague Basin. Positive δ13C shifts are often coupled with trends of decreasing computed gamma-ray (CGR) values interpreted as regressions, whereas negative δ13C shifts commonly coincide with opposite trends in CGR. The Lochkovian-Pragian boundary interval coincided with an increase in carbonate δ13C and an increase in the δ18O of conodont apatite and carbonate, which we interpret as consequence of climate cooling. Generally, the Lochkovian was warmer than the Pragian and earliest Emsian.