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Long-distance stress and developmental signals associated with abscisic acid signaling in environmental responses

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Yoshida,  T.
Central Metabolism, Department Willmitzer, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;

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Fernie,  A. R.
Central Metabolism, Department Willmitzer, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Yoshida, T., Fernie, A. R., Shinozaki, K., & Takahashi, F. (2020). Long-distance stress and developmental signals associated with abscisic acid signaling in environmental responses. The Plant Journal. doi:10.1111/tpj.15101.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-7ACF-8
Abstract
Summary Flowering plants consist of highly differentiated organs including roots, leaves, shoots, and flowers and these organs have specific roles: the root system for water and nutrient uptake, leaves for photosynthesis and gas exchange and reproductive organs for seed production. The communication between organs through the vascular system, by which water, nutrient, and signaling molecules are transported, is essential for co-ordinated growth and development of the whole plant, especially under adverse conditions. Here, we highlight recent progress in understanding how signaling pathways of plant hormones are associated with long-distance stress and developmental signals, with particular focus on environmental stress responses. In addition to the root-to-shoot peptide signal that induces abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation in leaves under drought stress conditions, we summarize the diverse stress-responsive peptide signals reported to data to play a role in environmental responses.