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Retracing the evolutionary emergence of thymopoiesis

MPS-Authors
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Swann,  Jeremy
Department of Developmental Immunology, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

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Nusser,  Anja
Department of Developmental Immunology, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

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Ryo,  Morimoto
Department of Developmental Immunology, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

Nagakubo,  Daisuke
Department of Developmental Immunology, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

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Boehm,  Thomas
Department of Developmental Immunology, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Swann, J., Nusser, A., Ryo, M., Nagakubo, D., & Boehm, T. (2020). Retracing the evolutionary emergence of thymopoiesis. Science Advances, 6, 1-14. doi:10.1126/sciadv.abd9585.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-8598-7
Abstract
The onset of lymphocyte development in the vertebrate primordial thymus, about 500 million years ago, represents one of the foundational events of the emerging adaptive immune system. Here, we retrace the evolutionary trajectory of thymopoiesis, from early vertebrates to mammals, guided by members of the Foxn1/4 transcription factor gene family, which direct the differentiation of the thymic microenvironment. Molecular engineering in transgenic mice recapitulated a gene duplication event, exon replacements, and altered expression patterns. These changes predictably modified the lymphopoietic characteristics of the thymus, identifying molecular features contributing to conversion of a primordial bipotent lymphoid organ to a tissue specializing in T cell development. The phylogenetic reconstruction associates increasing efficiency of T cell generation with diminishing B cell–generating capacity of the thymus during jawed vertebrate evolution.