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Journal Article

Self-organization and positioning of bacterial protein clusters

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Murray,  S.
Research Group Mechanisms of Spatial-Organisation, Department of Systems and Synthetic Microbiology, Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Sourjik,  V.
Microbial Networks, Department of Systems and Synthetic Microbiology, Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Max Planck Society;
Center for Synthetic Microbiology (SYNMIKRO);

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Citation

Murray, S., & Sourjik, V. (2017). Self-organization and positioning of bacterial protein clusters. Nature Physics, 13(10), 1006-1013. doi:10.1038/nphys4155.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-BAC1-D
Abstract
Many cellular processes require proteins to be precisely positioned within the cell. In some cases this can be attributed to passive mechanisms such as recruitment by other proteins in the cell or by exploiting the curvature of the membrane. However, in bacteria, active self-positioning is likely to play a role in multiple processes, including the positioning of the future site of cell division and cytoplasmic protein clusters. How can such dynamic clusters be formed and positioned? Here, we present a model for the self-organization and positioning of dynamic protein clusters into regularly repeating patterns based on a phase-locked Turing pattern. A single peak in the concentration is always positioned at the midpoint of the model cell, and two peaks are positioned at the midpoint of each half. Furthermore, domain growth results in peak splitting and pattern doubling. We argue that the model may explain the regular positioning of the highly conserved structural maintenance of chromosomes complexes on the bacterial nucleoid and that it provides an attractive mechanism for the self-positioning of dynamic protein clusters in other systems.