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Journal Article

Regulation of cell polarity in bacteria

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Treuner-Lange,  A.
Bacterial Adaption and Differentiation, Department of Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Sogaard-Andersen,  L.
Bacterial Adaption and Differentiation, Department of Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Treuner-Lange, A., & Sogaard-Andersen, L. (2014). Regulation of cell polarity in bacteria. Journal of Cell Biology, 206(1), 7-17. doi:10.1083/jcb.201403136.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-BDF3-2
Abstract
Bacteria are polarized cells with many asymmetrically localized proteins that are regulated temporally and spatially. This spatiotemporal dynamics is critical for several fundamental cellular processes including growth, division, cell cycle regulation, chromosome segregation, differentiation, and motility. Therefore, understanding how proteins find their correct location at the right time is crucial for elucidating bacterial cell function. Despite the diversity of proteins displaying spatiotemporal dynamics, general principles for the dynamic regulation of protein localization to the cell poles and the midcell are emerging. These principles include diffusion-capture, self-assembling polymer-forming landmark proteins, nonpolymer forming landmark proteins, matrix-dependent self-organizing ParA/MinD ATPases, and small Ras-like GTPases.