English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Detection of Opposite Magnetic Polarity in a Light Bridge: Its Emergence and Cancellation in Association with LB Fan-shaped Jets

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons104060

Madjarska,  Maria S.
Department Sun and Heliosphere, Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Max Planck Society;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Lim, E.-K., Yang, H., Yurchyshyn, V., Chae, J., Song, D., & Madjarska, M. S. (2020). Detection of Opposite Magnetic Polarity in a Light Bridge: Its Emergence and Cancellation in Association with LB Fan-shaped Jets. The Astrophysical Journal, 904(2): 84. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/abc1e0.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-914E-E
Abstract
Light bridges (LBs) are relatively bright structures that divide sunspot umbrae into two or more parts. Chromospheric LBs are known to be associated with various activities including fan-shaped jet-like ejections and brightenings. Although magnetic reconnection is frequently suggested to be responsible for such activities, not many studies present firm evidence to support the scenario. We carry out magnetic field measurements and imaging spectroscopy of an LB where fan-shaped jet-like ejections occur with co-spatial brightenings at their footpoints. We study LB fine structure and magnetic field changes using TiO images, Near-InfraRed Imaging Spectropolarimeter, and H alpha data taken by the 1.6 m Goode Solar Telescope. We detect magnetic flux emergence in the LB that is of opposite polarity to that of the sunspot. The new magnetic flux cancels with the pre-existing flux at a rate of 5.6 x 10(18) Mx hr(-1). Both the recurrent jet-like ejections and their base brightenings are initiated at the vicinity of the magnetic flux cancellation, and show apparent horizontal extension along the LB at a projected speed of up to km s(-1) to form a fan-shaped appearance. Based on these observations, we suggest that the fan-shaped ejections may have resulted from slipping reconnection between the new flux emerging in the LB and the ambient sunspot field.