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Orientation and navigation in the animal world

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Durieux,  Gillian
Max Planck Research Group Behavioural Genomics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Liedvogel,  Miriam
Max Planck Research Group Behavioural Genomics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Durieux, G., & Liedvogel, M. (2020). Orientation and navigation in the animal world. In J. Y. Morton, F. v. Diggelen, J. J. Spilker Jr., & B. W. Parkinson (Eds.), Position navigation & timing technologies in the 21st century (pp. 1689-1709). Wiley-IEEE. doi:10.1002/9781119458555.ch54.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-9CDC-2
Abstract
Orientation behavior with the combined use of a clock and a biological compass is widely practiced in a huge array of animals, both by naïve juveniles and experienced adults. For animals, both orientation and navigation require dependence on multiple sensory systems to detect sources of directional information to use as a reference in their environments. In general, star compass use in animals has not received a considerable amount of attention compared to other compass systems, maybe due to experimental and logistical constraints. Based on birds, two potential mechanisms have been put forward: a chemical reaction in the bird's eyes known as the radical‐pair compass, and a mechanical receptor based on magnetic particles. The radical‐pair mechanism has been suggested to possess the chemical properties needed to function as a magnetosensor.