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Population genetic structure of four regional populations of the barley pathogen Pyrenophora teres f. maculata in Iran is characterized by high genetic diversity and sexual recombination

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Landermann-Habetha,  Doreen
Max Planck Fellow Group Environmental Genomics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Feurtey,  Alice
Max Planck Fellow Group Environmental Genomics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Stukenbrock,  Eva Holtgrewe
Max Planck Fellow Group Environmental Genomics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Vasighzadeh, A., Sharifnabi, B., Javan-Nikkhah, M., Seifollahi, E., Landermann-Habetha, D., Feurtey, A., et al. (2020). Population genetic structure of four regional populations of the barley pathogen Pyrenophora teres f. maculata in Iran is characterized by high genetic diversity and sexual recombination. Plant Pathology, 00, 1-10. doi:10.1111/ppa.13326.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-9ECB-3
Abstract
The leaf spot form of the barley disease net blotch, caused by the fungus Pyrenophora teres f. maculata (PTM), is an increasingly important foliar disease of barley. Studies of population genetic structure and reproductive mode are necessary to make predictions of the evolutionary potential of the pathogen. Sources of resistance to PTM have been found in Iranian landraces, which may have the potential to improve plant breeding efforts. However, little is known about the population genetic structure of this fungus in Iran. In this study, we analysed the frequency of the mating type genes to assess the potential for sexual mating of PTM collected from four provinces-Khuzestan, Hamadan, Golestan, and East Azerbaijan-and we investigated the population genetic structure using seven simple sequence repeat markers. High genotype diversity, linkage equilibrium, and equal ratios of mating types frequencies in the PTM populations at Khuzestan and Hamadan support the occurrence of sexual reproduction in these populations, while in Golestan and East Azerbaijan populations, significant gametic disequilibrium and relatively low genotype diversity suggest a higher incidence of clonality or different demographic histories. Unequal mating type frequencies in Golestan confirm a predominance of asexual reproduction. Finally, we found significant evidence for strong population structure with most of the genetic variation represented within regional populations (89%). Overall, our study provides evidence for high genetic variation in Iranian PTM populations, which may be the basis for rapid adaptive evolution in this pathosystem. This highlights the need for integrated efforts to control the disease.