English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Mineral density differences between femoral cortical bone and trabecular bone are not explained by turnover rate alone

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons122011

Weinkamer,  Richard
Richard Weinkamer, Biomaterialien, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons136530

Roschger,  Andreas
Wolfgang Wagermaier, Biomaterialien, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)

Article.pdf
(Publisher version), 3MB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Lerebours, C., Weinkamer, R., Roschger, A., & Buenzli, P. R. (2020). Mineral density differences between femoral cortical bone and trabecular bone are not explained by turnover rate alone. Bone Reports, 13: 100731. doi:10.1016/j.bonr.2020.100731.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-A15C-C
Abstract
Bone mineral density distributions (BMDDs) are a measurable property of bone tissues that depends strongly on bone remodelling and mineralisation processes. These processes can vary significantly in health and disease and across skeletal sites, so there is high interest in analysing these processes from experimental BMDDs. Here, we propose a rigorous hypothesis-testing approach based on a mathematical model of mineral heterogeneity in bone due to remodelling and mineralisation, to help explain differences observed between the BMDD of human femoral cortical bone and the BMDD of human trabecular bone. Recent BMDD measurements show that femoral cortical bone possesses a higher bone mineral density, but a similar mineral heterogeneity around the mean compared to trabecular bone. By combining this data with the mathematical model, we are able to test whether this difference in BMDD can be explained by (i) differences in turnover rate; (ii) differences in osteoclast resorption behaviour; and (iii) differences in mineralisation kinetics between the two bone types. We find that accounting only for differences in turnover rate is inconsistent with the fact that both BMDDs have a similar spread around the mean, and that accounting for differences in osteoclast resorption behaviour leads to biologically inconsistent bone remodelling patterns. We conclude that the kinetics of mineral accumulation in bone matrix must therefore be different in femoral cortical bone and trabecular bone. Although both cortical and trabecular bone are made up of lamellar bone, the different mineralisation kinetics in the two types of bone point towards more profound structural differences than usually assumed.