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Continuous-flow production of isosorbide from aqueous-cellulosic derivable feed over sustainable heterogeneous catalysts

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Brandi,  Francesco
Majd Al-Naji, Kolloidchemie, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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Antonietti,  Markus
Markus Antonietti, Kolloidchemie, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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Al-Naji,  Majd
Majd Al-Naji, Kolloidchemie, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Brandi, F., Khalil, I., Antonietti, M., & Al-Naji, M. (2021). Continuous-flow production of isosorbide from aqueous-cellulosic derivable feed over sustainable heterogeneous catalysts. ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, 9(2), 927-935. doi:10.1021/acssuschemeng.0c08167.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-9FAD-4
Abstract
Continuous-flow sorbitol dehydration in liquid water was performed on β zeolite (Si/Al molar ratio = 75) with conversion of 94 and 83 mol % isosorbide yield. This efficiency is due to the three-dimension pore architecture, high specific surface area (520 m2 g–1), and Brønsted acid sites of 69 μmol g–1. The pore size of β zeolite (6.6 × 6.7 Å2) is slightly larger than the cross section of sorbitol and isosorbide and enables an efficient diffusion of the reactant and product to/from the pores. Operation in continuous flow allows rapid dehydration of sorbitol to 1,4-sorbitan, after which the latter got converted to isosorbide. The high yield of isosorbide is attributed to the continuous removal of the formed products from the catalyst surface. Finally, direct isosorbide production from aqueous glucose solution via hydrogenation on Ni catalyst supported on nitrogen-doped carbon, followed by dehydration of the formed sorbitol to isosorbide, was pioneered.