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An anatomical study of the dorsal and ventral nasal conchal bullae and middle nasal conchae in normal Shetland ponies: Computed tomographic anatomical and morphometric findings (advance online)

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Schulz-Kornas,  Ellen
Max Planck Weizmann Center for integrative Archaeology and Anthropology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;
Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Gerlach, K., Vervuert, I., Gittel, C., Köhler, L., Schmidt, N., Winter, K., et al. (2020). An anatomical study of the dorsal and ventral nasal conchal bullae and middle nasal conchae in normal Shetland ponies: Computed tomographic anatomical and morphometric findings (advance online). Anatomia, Histologia, Embryologia. doi:10.1111/ahe.12646.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-A12E-0
Abstract
Abstract Equine paranasal sinuses are susceptible to inflammation. Insufficient drainage through the nasal passages and meatus may lead to the accumulation of inspissated purulent discharge. Particularly in ponies, these anatomical structures are suspected to be relatively small. To date, there are no reports considering the morphology of nasal conchal bullae in small horse breeds such as Shetland ponies. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the size of the conchal bullae and the medial nasal conchae of Shetland ponies and their relation to the skull dimension using computed tomography. Reconstructed images of healthy adult heads of Shetland ponies were used. Linear skull measurements as well as two cranial indices of the head dimensions were taken. Length, width and height of the dorsal and ventral conchal bullae and the medial nasal conchae were measured in relation to the skull and compared with the data of skulls of large breed horses. The anatomical proportions of pony heads were characterized by a smaller cranial index and a greater nasal index than those of large breed horses. Shetland ponies showed a longer cranial length compared with the nasal length. Heads are consistently smaller, and the relationship of the bullae to the head length was also smaller than those measured in large breed horses. A negative correlation between the head and bullae size was found. In conclusion, this study suggests that Shetland ponies have distinguishing proportions of the head. These findings are relevant for clinical examination and surgical treatment of equine sinus disease in those breeds.