English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Strontium (87Sr/86Sr) isotope analysis of the Namu skeletal assemblage: A study of past human migration on Taumako, a Polynesian Outlier in the eastern Solomon Islands (advance online)

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons98220

Jaouen,  Klervia
Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society ;

/persons/resource/persons245334

Trost,  Manuel
Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society ;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Kramer, R. T., King, C. L., Buckley, H. R., Jaouen, K., Boyd, D. A., Kiko, L., et al. (2020). Strontium (87Sr/86Sr) isotope analysis of the Namu skeletal assemblage: A study of past human migration on Taumako, a Polynesian Outlier in the eastern Solomon Islands (advance online). American Journal of Physical Anthropology. doi:10.1002/ajpa.24179.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-A193-C
Abstract
Abstract Objectives This study aims to assess if inter-island mobility can be identified during the Namu period (ca. 1,510?1800?AD) using 87Sr/86Sr analysis of dental enamel for individuals from the Namu burial ground on Taumako Island in the eastern Solomon Island Chain. Historic evidence from this region suggests that females migrated between the Duff, Reef, and Santa Cruz islands for marriage purposes. We hypothesize that observable trends in migrational (87Sr/86Sr) and dietary (δ13C and δ15N) isotopes can reveal the relationship between demographic factors, social status, diet, and female mobility on Taumako. Methods This research analyzes enamel 87Sr/86Sr for 58 individuals in the Namu skeletal sample. The 87Sr/86Sr results were compared with published dietary isotope data (bone collagen and dentin δ13C and δ15N values) and type/number of grave goods to assess whether trends within the data may be related to sex, age, or burial wealth. Results The results show that females display significantly higher 87Sr/86Sr values compared to males. One young adult female displayed a 87Sr/86Sr value that was +2SD outside the mean for the sampled individuals. A linear mixed-effects model and principle components analysis of 87Sr/86Sr, δ13C, and δ15N values suggest that wealth, sex, and age-cohort membership have an observable influence on the isotopic variation for the Taumako population. Conclusion We suggest that during the Namu period, Taumako was patrilocal and that some females migrated there from the nearby Santa Cruz and Reef islands. One female immigrated to Taumako from a geologically distinct region outside of the Duff, Reef, and Santa Cruz Island groups.