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Interaction of Hydrogen with Ceria: Hydroxylation, Reduction, and Hydride Formation on the Surface and in the Bulk

MPS-Authors
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Werner,  Kristin
Chemical Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Zhong,  JianQiang
Chemical Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Shaikhutdinov,  Shamil K.
Chemical Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Freund,  Hans-Joachim
Chemical Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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chem.202005374.pdf
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Citation

Li, Z., Werner, K., Chen, L., Jia, A., Qian, K., Zhong, J., et al. (2020). Interaction of Hydrogen with Ceria: Hydroxylation, Reduction, and Hydride Formation on the Surface and in the Bulk. Chemistry – A European Journal. doi:10.1002/chem.202005374.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-A33B-F
Abstract
The study reports on a first attempt to address the interplay between surface and bulk in hydride formation in ceria (CeO2) by combining experiment, using surface sensitive and bulk sensitive spectroscopic techniques on the two sample systems, i.e., CeO2(111) thin films and CeO2 powders, and theoretical calculations of CeO2(111) surfaces with oxygen vacancies (Ov) at the surface and in the bulk. We show that, on a stoichiometric CeO2(111) surface, H2 dissociates and forms surface hydroxyls (OH). On the pre‐reduced CeO2 samples, both films and powders, hydroxyls and hydrides (Ce‐H) are formed on the surface as well as in the bulk, accompanied by the Ce3+«Ce4+ redox reaction. As the Ov concentration increases, hydroxyl is destabilized and hydride becomes more stable. Surface hydroxyl is more stable than bulk hydroxyl, whereas bulk hydride is more stable than surface hydride. The surface hydride formation is the kinetically‐favorable process at relatively low temperatures, and the resulting surface hydride may diffuse into the bulk region and be stabilized therein. At higher temperatures, surface hydroxyls can react to produce water and create additional oxygen vacancies, increasing its concentration, which controls the H2/CeO2 interaction. The results demonstrate a large diversity of reaction pathways, which have to be taken into account for better understanding of reactivity of ceria‐based catalysts in a hydrogen‐rich atmosphere.