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A comparison of microfluidic methods for high-throughput cell deformability measurements

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Urbanska,  Marta
Guck Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;
Technische Universität Dresden;

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Guck,  Jochen
Max-Planck-Zentrum für Physik und Medizin, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;
Guck Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;
Technische Universität Dresden;

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nihms-1579163.pdf
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Citation

Urbanska, M., Munoz, H. E., Bagnall, J. S., Otto, O., Manalis, S. R., Di Carlo, D., et al. (2020). A comparison of microfluidic methods for high-throughput cell deformability measurements. Nature Methods, 17(6), 587-593. doi:10.1038/s41592-020-0818-8.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-A6B2-4
Abstract
The mechanical phenotype of a cell is an inherent biophysical marker of its state and function, with many applications in basic and applied biological research. Microfluidics-based methods have enabled single-cell mechanophenotyping at throughputs comparable to those of flow cytometry. Here, we present a standardized cross-laboratory study comparing three microfluidics-based approaches for measuring cell mechanical phenotype: constriction-based deformability cytometry (cDC), shear flow deformability cytometry (sDC) and extensional flow deformability cytometry (xDC). All three methods detect cell deformability changes induced by exposure to altered osmolarity. However, a dose-dependent deformability increase upon latrunculin B-induced actin disassembly was detected only with cDC and sDC, which suggests that when exposing cells to the higher strain rate imposed by xDC, cellular components other than the actin cytoskeleton dominate the response. The direct comparison presented here furthers our understanding of the applicability of the different deformability cytometry methods and provides context for the interpretation of deformability measurements performed using different platforms. This Analysis compares microfluidics-based methods for assessing mechanical properties of cells in high throughput.