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Bio-inspired thiolate metal complexes structural, spectroscopic and redox properties, reactivity

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Neese,  Frank
Research Department Neese, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion, Max Planck Society;

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van Gastel,  Maurice
Research Department Neese, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion, Max Planck Society;

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DeBeer,  Serena
Research Department Neese, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Gennari, M., Brazzolotto, D., Orio, M., Neese, F., van Gastel, M., DeBeer, S., et al. (2014). Bio-inspired thiolate metal complexes structural, spectroscopic and redox properties, reactivity. Talk presented at 12th European Biological Inorganic Chemistry Conference. Zurich, Switzerland. 2014-08-24 - 2014-08-28. doi:10.1007/s00775-014-1157-y.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-A83B-A
Abstract
Metal sulfur bonds are largely found in metalloenzymes, and lead to specific spectroscopic properties and original reactivity in comparison with complexes containing only N-or/and O-based ligands. On the other hand, synthetic complexes with metal-thiolate bonds have revealed some interesting properties that could be involved in biological processes. However, to rationalize the reactivity of such systems, a deep investigation of their electronic properties is required. In this context, we have synthesized and characterized series of aliphatic thiolate complexes with various transition metal ions (Ni, Co, Zn, Cu, Mn, V) [1–3]. Their electronic properties have been explored via different spectroscopic techniques combined with quantum chemistry. More recently, we went a step further by looking at their reactivity, especially their ability to activate small molecules, or to form disulfide bridges and how this process can be controlled.