English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Conditional protein tagging methods reveal highly specific subcellular distribution of ion channels in motion-sensing neurons

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons211294

Fendl,  Sandra
Department: Circuits-Computation-Models / Borst, MPI of Neurobiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons255673

Vieira,  Renee Marie
Department: Circuits-Computation-Models / Borst, MPI of Neurobiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons38770

Borst,  Alexander
Department: Circuits-Computation-Models / Borst, MPI of Neurobiology, Max Planck Society;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)

elife-62953-v3.pdf
(Publisher version), 11MB

Supplementary Material (public)

elife-62953-figures-v3.pdf
(Supplementary material), 14MB

Citation

Fendl, S., Vieira, R. M., & Borst, A. (2020). Conditional protein tagging methods reveal highly specific subcellular distribution of ion channels in motion-sensing neurons. eLife, 9: e62953. doi:10.7554/eLife.62953.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-AB99-C
Abstract
Neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels shape the biophysical properties of neurons, from the sign of the response mediated by neurotransmitter receptors to the dynamics shaped by voltage-gated ion channels. Therefore, knowing the localizations and types of receptors and channels present in neurons is fundamental to our understanding of neural computation. Here, we developed two approaches to visualize the subcellular localization of specific proteins in Drosophila: The flippase-dependent expression of GFP-tagged receptor subunits in single neurons and 'FlpTag', a versatile new tool for the conditional labelling of endogenous proteins. Using these methods, we investigated the subcellular distribution of the receptors GluCl alpha, Rdl, and D alpha 7 and the ion channels para and lh in motion-sensing T4/T5 neurons of the Drosophila visual system. We discovered a strictly segregated subcellular distribution of these proteins and a sequential spatial arrangement of glutamate, acetylcholine, and GABA receptors along the dendrite that matched the previously reported EM-reconstructed synapse distributions.