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The pre-Columbian site of Roseau (Guadeloupe, F. W. I.): intra-site chronological variability of the subsistence strategies in a Late Ceramic archeological vertebrate assemblage

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Bochaton,  Corentin
Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

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Richter,  Kristine Korzow
Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

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Bochaton, C., Ephrem, B., Bérard, B., Cochard, D., Gala, M., Richter, K. K., et al. (2021). The pre-Columbian site of Roseau (Guadeloupe, F. W. I.): intra-site chronological variability of the subsistence strategies in a Late Ceramic archeological vertebrate assemblage. Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences, 13(1): 16. doi:10.1007/s12520-020-01246-4.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-ADA1-0
Abstract
Evidence for chronological change in intra-site subsistence strategies is very rare in the Amerindian record of the Lesser Antilles. The study of the vertebrate assemblage from the archeological site of Roseau in the Guadeloupe Islands underlines the complexity and variability of Ceramic Age Amerindian subsistence behavior. This study establishes a more precise chronology of the previously identified strata of the site, and demonstrates that the Contact period was only represented by rare archeological artifacts dispersed in the stratigraphy. The results from this assemblage indicate that the earlier occupations of the site exhibit a more intensive exploitation of aquatic vertebrate resources compared to later occupations, which have a larger focus on terrestrial fauna, especially rodents and iguanas. This unusual pattern highlights how subsistence behaviors in the Lesser Antilles during the Late and Final Ceramic periods were highly variable. This new evidence of strong inter-site variability shows that the behaviors of Amerindians are not only dependent of large-scale environmental conditions but also influenced by more complex socio-cultural and local environmental parameters.