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'Emptying Forests?': Conservation implications of past human-primate interactions

MPS-Authors
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Amano,  Noel
Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

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Wang,  Yiming
Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

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Boivin,  Nicole
Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

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Roberts,  Patrick
Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Amano, N., Wang, Y., Boivin, N., & Roberts, P. (2021). 'Emptying Forests?': Conservation implications of past human-primate interactions. Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 2020.12.0004. doi:10.1016/j.tree.2020.12.004.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-B1A8-3
Abstract
Non-human primates are among the most vulnerable tropical animals to extinction and ~50% of primate species are endangered. Human hunting is considered a major cause of increasingly ?empty forests?, yet archaeological data remains under-utilised in testing this assertion over the longer-term. Zooarchaeological datasets allow investigation of human exploitation of primates and the reconstruction of extinction, extirpation, and translocation processes. We evaluate the application and limitations of data from zooarchaeological studies spanning the past 45 000 years in South and Southeast Asia in guiding primate conservation efforts. We highlight that environmental change was the primary threat to many South and Southeast Asian non-human primate populations during much of the Holocene, foreshadowing human-induced land-use and environmental change as major threats of the 21st century.