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Journal Article

Reabsorption of monocarboxylic acids in the proximal tubule of the rat kidney

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Ullrich,  Karl Julius
Department of Physiology, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max Planck Society;

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Rumrich,  Gerhard
Department of Physiology, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max Planck Society;

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Klöss,  Sonja
Department of Physiology, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Ullrich, K. J., Rumrich, G., & Klöss, S. (1982). Reabsorption of monocarboxylic acids in the proximal tubule of the rat kidney. Pflügers Archiv: European Journal of Physiology, 395, 212-219. doi:10.1007/BF00584812.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0008-132A-4
Abstract
The transport ofd-lactate across the epithelium of the late proximal convolution was investigated by two methods: 1. by measuring the zero net flux transtubular concentration difference (Δc tt,45s) and the permeability (P) ofd-lactate and calculating from both the transtubular active transport rate (J actlac ). 2. By measuring the 3.5 s efflux ofd-lactate from the tubular lumen, while blood was flowing through the capillaries. The 3.5 s efflux comprises two components, one going through the brush border (Jbblac ) and one going the paracellular pathway (J paracelllac =P lac·c lac lumen). Both, J actlac and J bblac of d-lactate gave the same Km 1.9 and 1.7 mmol/l and the same maximal transport rate 3.2 and 2.9 pmol cm−1 s−1. The Ki of l-lactate tested against J actlac and J bblac of d-lactate was also the same: 1.1 and 1.0 mmol/l. These data indicate that under our experimental conditions only the flux through the brush border seems to be rate limiting and that d-lactate uses the same transport system as l-lactate. When Na+ was omitted from the perfusates J actlac disappeared completely, while J bblac was reduced by 64%. These data reflect the Na+ dependence of the d-lactate transport through the brush border. Variation of intra-and extracellular pH by raising p CO2, omitting HCO3 from the perfusates or adding acetazolamide had no effect on the transport of d-lactate when α-keto glutarate was used as fuel. However, when acetate was used as fuel, intracellular acidosis brought the reduced J actlac back to the values obtained with α-ketoglutarate as fuel. It is suggested that this is an effect on a contraluminal transport step. Probenecid (5 mmol/l) and phloretin (0.25 mmol/l) inhibited J actlac significantly. J bblac, however, was only inhibited by probenecid when acetate was used as fuel. These data indicate that both compounds act on thed-lactate exit at the contraluminal cell side, but that probenecid acts in addition at the luminal cell side. SITS (1 mmol/l) augmented J bblac when acetate was used as fuel and is similar to the effect of lowering intracellular pH as described above. The SH reagents mersalyl (1.0 mmol/l) and maleolylglycine (1 mmol/l) did not influence J bblac .