English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Thesis

The emergence and organization of communicative signals through interaction

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons221903

Müller,  Thomas F.
The Mint, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Müller, T. F. (2021). The emergence and organization of communicative signals through interaction (PhD Thesis, Universität Jena, Sozial- und Verhaltenswissenschaften, Jena, 2021).


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-E53C-4
Abstract
Social interaction is a key feature of our daily lives; humans simply cannot help but interact with one another. This interaction is special with regard to its quantity, but it also shows distinct qualities such as a special propensity to read each other’s intentions. One specific kind of interaction that humans engage in frequently and that exemplifies this particularly well is communication. By producing and interpreting signals in their specific context, interlocutors are able to communicate successfully, even about concepts for which they do not yet share conventional signs. Over repeated interaction, these novel signals can conventionalize, and eventually be culturally transmitted to new individuals. Through repeated episodes of transmission, entire communicative systems, such as languages, can emerge and evolve. In this thesis, I build on the framework outlined above to study how human communicative signals can emerge and become organized via interaction. To this end, I present the results of three empirical studies each concerned with one specific question under this account. The first study represents two artificial language experiments investigating the role of context for the successful emergence of novel communicative conventions. This relates to the broad question of how human communicative signals can emerge in the first place; although the necessity of communication in context has been argued for in many pragmatic frameworks, little empirical work about it has been done at the stage of emergence. The results demonstrate that access to the shared context, i.e. the amount of information two interlocutors have in common, improves communicative success with novel conventions. Furthermore, conventions that were created under the condition of shared context could be generalized more successfully to novel contexts as well. The second study takes a step back in perspective and focuses on the evolution of population-level cultural patterns. A known result from artificial language experiments is that evolving communication systems can become compressed as a response to simplifying pressures, such as the need to memorize the signals’ meanings. Building on this idea, the study investigates whether similar compression effects can be found in the evolution of a large-scale visual art collaboration by analyzing a massive dataset of online behavior. Here, a rising pressure for simplification was hypothesized to occur due to increasing competition between the participants. The main results of the study show that compressible patterns did develop, could be predicted through time from the increasing competition, and occurred due to the evolution of systematic structure, not mere Social interaction is a key feature of our daily lives; humans simply cannot help but interact with one another. This interaction is special with regard to its quantity, but it also shows distinct qualities such as a special propensity to read each other’s intentions. One specific kind of interaction that humans engage in frequently and that exemplifies this particularly well is communication. By producing and interpreting signals in their specific context, interlocutors are able to communicate successfully, even about concepts for which they do not yet share conventional signs. Over repeated interaction, these novel signals can conventionalize, and eventually be culturally transmitted to new individuals. Through repeated episodes of transmission, entire communicative systems, such as languages, can emerge and evolve. In this thesis, I build on the framework outlined above to study how human communicative signals can emerge and become organized via interaction. To this end, I present the results of three empirical studies each concerned with one specific question under this account. The first study represents two artificial language experiments investigating the role of context for the successful emergence of novel communicative conventions. This relates to the broad question of how human communicative signals can emerge in the first place; although the necessity of communication in context has been argued for in many pragmatic frameworks, little empirical work about it has been done at the stage of emergence. The results demonstrate that access to the shared context, i.e. the amount of information two interlocutors have in common, improves communicative success with novel conventions. Furthermore, conventions that were created under the condition of shared context could be generalized more successfully to novel contexts as well. The second study takes a step back in perspective and focuses on the evolution of population-level cultural patterns. A known result from artificial language experiments is that evolving communication systems can become compressed as a response to simplifying pressures, such as the need to memorize the signals’ meanings. Building on this idea, the study investigates whether similar compression effects can be found in the evolution of a large-scale visual art collaboration by analyzing a massive dataset of online behavior. Here, a rising pressure for simplification was hypothesized to occur due to increasing competition between the participants. The main results of the study show that compressible patterns did develop, could be predicted through time from the increasing competition, and occurred due to the evolution of systematic structure, not mere increasing homogeneity. This relates to the broad question of how cultural traits in general (and communicative signals in particular) can become organized via interaction – cooperative and competitive. The third study combines the perspectives of the first two studies and aims to relate existing communicative conventions about color terms in natural languages to novel conventions created within the environment of a custom smartphone application, designed to study language evolution. This relates to both the emergence and organization of communicative signals, as the focus is on the emerging semantic structure applied for color categories. The first main finding is that for native speakers of English, German, and French, there was a good to moderate correspondence between natural language and artificial language semantic structure. Secondly, for native speakers of English, communicative performance and the number of sent signals could be predicted by the shared semantic structure. The study can provide important insight into potential biases towards natural language structure in artificial language experiments, and opens up the possibility to investigate the effect of semantic structure on communicative performance without actually making use of the natural language of participants. The three studies show the usefulness of combining different methodological approaches – experimental laboratory studies, large-scale online experiments, and massive data sets of online behavior – to address questions at different levels of granularity. Taken together, the studies place individual interactions firmly at the base of both the emergence and organization of communicative signals. As a result of these interactions, entire systems of communication can emerge.
Soziale Interaktion ist ein wesentlicher Teil unseres täglichen Lebens; als Menschen können wir nicht anders, als miteinander zu interagieren. Diese Interaktion ist besonders in Hinsicht auf ihre Häufigkeit, aber auch ihre Qualität, wie z.B. der speziellen menschlichen Neigung dazu, die Absichten seines Gegenüber zu erkennen. Eine spezifische Art der Interaktion, an der Menschen häufig teilnehmen und die diese Qualität besonders gut demonstriert, ist Kommunikation. Indem sie Signale innerhalb eines spezifischen Kontexts produzieren und interpretieren, sind Gesprächspartner dazu in der Lage, erfolgreich zu kommunizieren, sogar über Konzepte, für die sie sich noch keine konventionellen Signale teilen. Mit wiederholter Interaktion können diese neuartigen Signale zur Konvention werden und schließlich kulturell an neue Individuen übertragen werden. Durch wiederholte Übertragung können ganze Kommunikationssysteme, wie z.B. Sprachen, entstehen und sich weiterentwickeln. In dieser Arbeit baue ich auf diese Grundlagen auf, um zu erforschen, wie menschliche Kommunikationssignale entstehen und durch Interaktion organisiert werden können. Dazu stelle ich die Ergebnisse dreier empirischer Studien vor, die sich jeweils mit einer spezifischen Frage in diesem Rahmen beschäftigen. Die erste Studie besteht aus zwei Experimenten mit einer künstlichen Sprache, die die Rolle des Kontexts für die erfolgreiche Entstehung neuer kommunikativer Konventionen untersuchen. Dies bezieht sich auf die übergeordnete Frage, wie menschliche Kommunikationssignale überhaupt entstehen können; obwohl viele pragmatische Modelle die Notwendigkeit des Kontexts für Kommunikation annehmen, ist bisher wenig empirische Forschung zum Zeitpunkt in Entstehung befindlicher Kommunikation durchgeführt worden. Die Ergebnisse zeigen, dass Zugang zu geteiltem Kontext, also die Menge an Information, die zwei Gesprächspartner gemeinsam haben, den kommunikativen Erfolg mittels neuer Konventionen verbessert. Weiterhin konnten Konventionen, die in der Bedingung mit geteiltem Kontext entstanden sind, besser für neue Kontexte generalisiert werden. Die zweite Studie vergrößert diese Perspektive und beschäftigt sich mit der Evolution kultureller Strukturen auf Populationsebene. Ein bekanntes Ergebnis aus Experimenten mit künstlichen Sprachen ist, dass sich entwickelnde Kommunikationssysteme komprimiert werden können, wenn Druck zur Vereinfachung auf sie ausgeübt wird, wie z.B. durch die Notwendigkeit, die Bedeutung von Signalen im Gedächtnis zu behalten. Die Studie baut auf diese Idee auf und prüft, ob ähnliche Kompressionseffekte in der Evolution eines kollaborativen visuellen Kunstprojektes entdeckt werden können, indem ein großer Datensatz zu Online-Verhalten analysiert wird. Ein steigender Druck zur Vereinfachung wird angenommen, weil der Wettbewerb zwischen den Teilnehmern über die Zeit zunimmt. Die zentralen Ergebnisse der Studie zeigen, dass sich komprimierbare Strukturen herausbildeten, die durch den mit der Zeit zunehmenden Wettbewerb vorhergesagt werden konnten und wegen der Evolution von systematischer Ordnung und nicht nur steigender Homogenität entstanden. Dies bezieht sich auf die übergeordnete Frage, wie kulturelle Merkmale im allgemeinen (und Kommunikationssignale im besonderen) durch Interaktion – kooperativ und konkurrierend – organisiert werden können. Die dritte Studie vereint die Perspektiven der ersten beiden Studien und vergleicht bestehende kommunikative Konventionen zu Farbwörtern in natürlichen Sprachen mit neuen Konventionen, die innerhalb einer eigens erstellten Smartphone-App zur Erforschung von Sprachevolution entstehen. Dies bezieht sich sowohl auf die Entstehung als auch die Organisation von Kommunikationssignalen, weil der Fokus auf der entstehenden semantischen Struktur liegt, die für Farbkategorien angewendet wird. Das erste zentrale Ergebnis ist, dass englische, deutsche und französische Muttersprachler eine gute bis moderate Übereinstimmung zwischen der semantischen Struktur in natürlicher Sprache und künstlicher Sprache zeigten. Zweitens konnte für englische Muttersprachler auch der kommunikative Erfolg und die Anzahl der benutzten Signale durch diese gemeinsame semantische Struktur vorhergesagt werden. Die Studie hat wichtige Implikationen hinsichtlich potentieller Verzerrungen in Richtung natürlicher Sprachstruktur bei Experimenten mit künstlichen Sprachen und eröffnet die Möglichkeit, den Effekt der semantischen Struktur auf kommunikativen Erfolg zu erforschen, ohne tatsächlich die natürliche Sprache von Teilnehmern zu benutzen. Die drei Studien zeigen die Vorteile davon auf, verschiedene methodische Herangehensweisen – Laborexperimente, groß angelegte Online-Experimente, und große Datensätze zu Online-Verhalten – zu kombinieren, um Fragestellungen in unterschiedlicher Auflösung zu betrachten. Insgesamt demonstrieren die Studien, dass individuelle Interaktionen die Grundlage für sowohl die Entstehung als auch Organisation von Kommunikationssignalen sind. Als Ergebnis dieser Interaktionen können ganze Kommunikationssysteme entstehen.