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Alternative possibility of GW190521: Gravitational waves from high-mass black hole-disk systems

MPS-Authors
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Shibata,  Masaru
Computational Relativistic Astrophysics, AEI-Golm, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Kiuchi,  Kenta
Computational Relativistic Astrophysics, AEI-Golm, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Fujibayashi,  Sho
Computational Relativistic Astrophysics, AEI-Golm, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

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2101.05440.pdf
(Preprint), 3MB

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Citation

Shibata, M., Kiuchi, K., Fujibayashi, S., & Sekiguchi, Y. (in preparation). Alternative possibility of GW190521: Gravitational waves from high-mass black hole-disk systems.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-F8AA-2
Abstract
We evolve high-mass disks of mass $15-50M_\odot$ orbiting a $50M_\odot$ spinning black hole in the framework of numerical relativity. Such high-mass systems could be an outcome during the collapse of rapidly-rotating very-massive stars. The massive disks are dynamically unstable to the so-called one-armed spiral-shape deformation with the maximum fractional density-perturbation of $\delta \rho/\rho \gtrsim 0.1$, and hence, high-amplitude gravitational waves are emitted. The waveforms are characterized by an initial high-amplitude burst with the frequency of $\sim 40-50$ Hz and the maximum amplitude of $(1-10)\times 10^{-22}$ at the hypothetical distance of 100 Mpc and by a subsequent low-amplitude quasi-periodic oscillation. We illustrate that the waveforms in our models with a wide range of the disk mass resemble that of GW190521. We also point out that gravitational waves from rapidly-rotating very-massive stars can be the source for 3rd-generation gravitational-wave detectors for exploring the formation process of rapidly-rotating high-mass black holes of mass $\sim 50-100M_\odot$ in an early universe.