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Transformation of soybean protoplasts from permanent suspension cultures by cocultivation with cells of Agrobacterium tumefaciens

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Baldes,  Robert
Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Moos,  Marion
Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Geider,  Klaus
Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Baldes, R., Moos, M., & Geider, K. (1987). Transformation of soybean protoplasts from permanent suspension cultures by cocultivation with cells of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Plant Molecular Biology, 9, 135-145. doi:10.1007/bf00015646.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0008-08FA-6
Abstract
Cell wall regenerating protoplasts from soybean cells kept in suspension culture were cocultivated with bacteria which were derived from the nopaline strain C58 of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. When the bacteria carried an oncogenic Ti-plasmid, about 5% of the surviving protoplasts were able to form calli on hormone-free agar in contrast to controls, where bacteria without Ti-plasmid were applied, and where no calli were formed. After isolation of DNA from hormone-independently growing cells further evidence for transformation was obtained by hybridization to Ti-plasmid specific RNA and by rescue of a segment with a bacterial resistance gene which had been inserted before into the T-DNA. Transfer of T-DNA harboring a neomycin-resistance gene activated by the nos-promoter resulted in calli growing on kanamycin. Verification of segments located at the left and the right part of the T-DNA indicated the presence of its entire length in transformed soybean cells. Expression of T-DNA genes was measured by the assay of nopaline-synthase. Cells cultured on agar had a much higher level of nopaline-synthase than fast growing cells in suspension culture. Transferring them to agar or treatment with azacytidine strongly increased synthesis of nopaline-synthase indicating a reversible repression presumably via a methylation mechanism.