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Population variability in social brain morphology for social support, household size and friendship satisfaction

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Schilbach,  Leonhard
Independent Max Planck Research Group Social Neuroscience, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;
IMPRS Translational Psychiatry, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Taebi, A., Kiesow, H., Vogeley, K., Schilbach, L., Bernhardt, B. C., & Bzdok, D. (2020). Population variability in social brain morphology for social support, household size and friendship satisfaction. SOCIAL COGNITIVE AND AFFECTIVE NEUROSCIENCE, 15(6), 635-647. doi:10.1093/scan/nsaa075.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0008-BC20-0
Abstract
The social brain hypothesis proposes that the complexity of human brains has coevolved with increasing complexity of social interactions in primate societies. The present study explored the possible relationships between brain morphology and the richness of more intimate `inner' and wider 'outer' social circles by integrating Bayesian hierarchical modeling with a large cohort sample from the UK Biobank resource (n= 10 000). In this way, we examined population volume effects in 36 regions of the 'social brain', ranging from lower sensory to higher associative cortices. We observed strong volume effects in the visual sensory network for the group of individuals with satisfying friendships. Further, the limbic network displayed several brain regions with substantial volume variations in individuals with a lack of social support. Our population neuroscience approach thus showed that distinct networks of the social brain show different patterns of volume variations linked to the examined social indices.