English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Conference Paper

The Biogeochemistry of Marine Polysaccharides: Sources, Inventories, and Bacterial Drivers of the Carbohydrate Cycle

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons210866

Wietz,  Mathias
HGF MPG Joint Research Group for Deep Sea Ecology & Technology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210443

Hehemann,  Jan Hendrik
University Bremen - MPI Joint Research Group for Marine Glycobiology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210690

Probandt,  D.
Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210902

Zeugner,  L.
Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210230

Amann,  R.
Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Arnosti, C., Wietz, M., Brinkhoff, T., Hehemann, J. H., Probandt, D., Zeugner, L., et al. (2021). The Biogeochemistry of Marine Polysaccharides: Sources, Inventories, and Bacterial Drivers of the Carbohydrate Cycle. Annual Review of Marine Science, 81-108.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0008-1891-9
Abstract
Polysaccharides are major components of macroalgal and phytoplankton biomass and constitute a large fraction of the organic matter produced and degraded in the ocean. Until recently, however, our knowledge of marine polysaccharides was limited due to their great structural complexity, the correspondingly complicated enzymatic machinery used by microbial communities to degrade them, and a lack of readily applied means to isolate and characterize polysaccharides in detail. Advances in carbohydrate chemistry, bioinformatics, molecular ecology, and microbiology have led to new insights into the structures of polysaccharides, the means by which they are degraded by bacteria, and the ecology of polysaccharide production and decomposition. Here, we survey current knowledge, discuss recent advances, and present a new conceptual model linking polysaccharide structural complexity and abundance to microbially driven mechanisms of polysaccharide processing. We conclude by highlighting specific future research foci that will shed light on this central but poorly characterized component of the marine carbon cycle.