English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Paper

Respiratory aerosols and droplets in the transmission of infectious diseases

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons203102

Pöhlker,  Mira L.
Multiphase Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons230468

Krüger,  Ovid O.
Multiphase Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons140313

Förster,  Jan-David
Multiphase Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons100922

Elbert,  Wolfgang
Multiphase Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons100944

Fröhlich-Nowoisky,  Janine
Multiphase Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons101189

Pöschl,  Ulrich
Multiphase Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons104597

Pöhlker,  Christopher
Multiphase Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons204273

Mikhailov,  Eugene
Multiphase Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Pöhlker, M. L., Krüger, O. O., Förster, J.-D., Elbert, W., Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J., Pöschl, U., et al. (2021). Respiratory aerosols and droplets in the transmission of infectious diseases.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0008-1A8D-D
Abstract
Knowing the physicochemical properties of exhaled droplets and aerosol particles is a prerequisite for a detailed mechanistic understanding and effective prevention of the airborne transmission of infectious human diseases. This article provides a critical review and synthesis of scientific knowledge on the number concentrations, size distributions, composition, mixing state, and related properties of respiratory particles emitted upon breathing, speaking, singing, coughing, and sneezing. We derive and present a parametrization of respiratory particle size distributions based on five lognormal modes related to different origins in the respiratory tract, which can be used to trace and localize the sources infectious particles. This approach may support the medical treatment as well as the risk assessment for aerosol and droplet transmission of infectious diseases. It was applied to analyze which respiratory activities may drive the spread of specific pathogens, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, influenza viruses, and SARS-CoV-2 viruses. The results confirm the high relevance of vocalization for the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 as well as the usefulness of face masks, including community, medical, and N95/FFP2 masks, as preventive measures against COVID-19 and other airborne infectious diseases.