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Differential regulation of local mRNA dynamics and translation following long-term potentiation and depression

MPS-Authors

Donlin-Asp,  Paul G.
Synaptic Plasticity Department, Max Planck Institute for Brain Research, Max Planck Society;

Polisseni,  Claudio
Synaptic Plasticity Department, Max Planck Institute for Brain Research, Max Planck Society;

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Schuman,  Erin M.
Synaptic Plasticity Department, Max Planck Institute for Brain Research, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Donlin-Asp, P. G., Polisseni, C., Klimek, R., Heckel, A., & Schuman, E. M. (2021). Differential regulation of local mRNA dynamics and translation following long-term potentiation and depression. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), 118 (13).


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0008-4D09-9
Abstract
Decades of work have demonstrated that messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are localized and translated within neuronal dendrites and axons to provide proteins for remodeling and maintaining growth cones or synapses. It remains unknown, however, whether specific forms of plasticity differentially regulate the dynamics and translation of individual mRNA species. To address this, we targeted three individual synaptically localized mRNAs, CamkIIa, β-actin, Psd95, and used molecular beacons to track endogenous mRNA movements. We used reporters and CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing to track mRNA translation in cultured neurons. We found alterations in mRNA dynamic properties occurred during two forms of synaptic plasticity, long-term potentiation (cLTP) and depression (mGluR-LTD). Changes in mRNA dynamics following either form of plasticity resulted in an enrichment of mRNA in the vicinity of dendritic spines. Both the reporters and tagging of endogenous proteins revealed the transcript-specific stimulation of protein synthesis following cLTP or mGluR-LTD. As such, the plasticity-induced enrichment of mRNA near synapses could be uncoupled from its translational status. The enrichment of mRNA in the proximity of spines allows for localized signaling pathways to decode plasticity milieus and stimulate a specific translational profile, resulting in a customized remodeling of the synaptic proteome.