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Journal Article

Ionic liquid gate-induced modifications of step edges at SrCoO2.5 surfaces

MPS-Authors
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Zhuang,  Yuechen
Nano-Systems from Ions, Spins and Electrons, Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Max Planck Society;

Cui,  Bin
Nano-Systems from Ions, Spins and Electrons, Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Max Planck Society;

Yang,  Hao
Nano-Systems from Ions, Spins and Electrons, Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons260827

Gao,  Fang
Nano-Systems from Ions, Spins and Electrons, Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons245678

Parkin,  Stuart S. P.
Nano-Systems from Ions, Spins and Electrons, Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Max Planck Society;

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acsnano.0c02880.pdf
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Citation

Zhuang, Y., Cui, B., Yang, H., Gao, F., & Parkin, S. S. P. (2020). Ionic liquid gate-induced modifications of step edges at SrCoO2.5 surfaces. ACS Nano, 14(7), 8562-8569. doi:10.1021/acsnano.0c02880.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0008-7EB9-B
Abstract
Intense electric fields developed during gating at the interface between an ionic liquid and an oxide layer have been shown to lead to significant structural and electronic phase transitions in the entire oxide layer. An archetypical example is the reversible transformation between the brownmillerite SrCoO2.5 and the perovskite SrCoO3 engendered by ionic liquid gating. Here we show using in situ atomic force microscopy studies with photothermal excitation detection, that allows for high quality measurements in the viscous environment of the ionic liquid that the edges of atomically smooth terraces at the surface ofSrCoO2.5 films are significantly modified by ionic liquid gating but that the terraces themselves remain smooth. The edges develop ridges that we show, using complementary X-ray photoemission spectroscopy studies, result from the adsorption of hydroxyl groups. Our findings exhibit a way of electrically controlled surface modifications in emergent ionitronic applications.