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Nickel precipitation in light and elevated temperature degraded multicrystalline silicon solar cells

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Deniz,  Hakan
Nano-Systems from Ions, Spins and Electrons, Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Max Planck Society;

Bauer,  Jan
Nano-Systems from Ions, Spins and Electrons, Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Max Planck Society;

Breitenstein,  Otwin
Nano-Systems from Ions, Spins and Electrons, Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Deniz, H., Bauer, J., & Breitenstein, O. (2018). Nickel precipitation in light and elevated temperature degraded multicrystalline silicon solar cells. Solar RRL, 2(9): 1800170. doi:/10.1002/solr.201800170.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0009-28F4-7
Abstract
Multicrystalline silicon passivated emitter and rear contact (PERC) solar cells often show light and elevated temperature-induced degradation (LeTID) followed by a regeneration process. In previous works, it has been found that this degradation/regeneration process can be described by a model including diffusion of still unknown recombination-active point defects to the cell surface. The diffusion coefficient of this unknown species is compatible with interstitial Ni diffusion in Si. In this work, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and highly sensitive energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) results from altogether 14 positions taken from two cells fabricated from neighboring wafers are evaluated, one of the cells remaining virgin and the other one LeTID degraded. In two of the degraded samples thin Ni-containing platelets are found, which are most probably nickel silicide platelets. This result is an indication that Ni can be involved in the LeTID degradation and regeneration process.