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Journal Article

Quantum magnetic properties in perovskite with Anderson localized artificial spin-1/2

MPS-Authors

Thomas,  Stefan
Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Ernst,  Arthur
Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Gunasekera, J., Dahal, A., Chen, Y., Rodriguez-Rivera, J. A., Harriger, L. W., Thomas, S., et al. (2018). Quantum magnetic properties in perovskite with Anderson localized artificial spin-1/2. Advanced Science, 5(5): 1700978. doi:10.1002/advs.201700978.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0009-2C35-B
Abstract
Quantum magnetic properties in a geometrically frustrated lattice of spin-1/2 magnet, such as quantum spin liquid or solid and the associated spin fractionalization, are considered key in developing a new phase of matter. The feasibility of observing the quantum magnetic properties, usually found in geometrically frustrated lattice of spin-1/2 magnet, in a perovskite material with controlled disorder is demonstrated. It is found that the controlled chemical disorder, due to the chemical substitution of Ru ions by Co-ions, in a simple perovskite CaRuO3 creates a random prototype configuration of artificial spin-1/2 that forms dimer pairs between the nearest and further away ions. The localization of the Co impurity in the Ru matrix is analyzed using the Anderson localization formulation. The dimers of artificial spin-1/2, due to the localization of Co impurities, exhibit singlet-to-triplet excitation at low temperature without any ordered spin correlation. The localized gapped excitation evolves into a gapless quasi-continuum as dimer pairs break and create freely fluctuating fractionalized spins at high temperature. Together, these properties hint at a new quantum magnetic state with strong resemblance to the resonance valence bond system.