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Sensitivity and resolution improvement for in-vivo magnetic resonance current density imaging (MRCDI) of the human brain

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Goeksu,  C
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Scheffler,  K
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons216029

Heule,  R
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Goeksu, C., Scheffler, K., Gregersen, F., Eroğlu, H., Heule, R., Siebner, H., et al. (2021). Sensitivity and resolution improvement for in-vivo magnetic resonance current density imaging (MRCDI) of the human brain. Poster presented at 2021 ISMRM & SMRT Annual Meeting & Exhibition (ISMRM 2021).


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0008-86D4-1
Abstract
Effective use of transcranial electrical stimulation (TES) in clinical and neuroscience applications requires the exact knowledge of TES currents. MRCDI uses MRI to measure the TES-induced magnetic fields for estimating the underlying current flow distributions. Their accuracy highly depends on the sensitivity and spatial resolution of the MR measurements. Here, we propose an advanced gradient-echo-based MRCDI method utilizing an optimized spoiling, acquisition-weighting, and navigators to achieve a noise sensitivity of 84pT at 2×2×3mm3 resolution for a total scan time of less than five minutes. We test the method's performance by phantom and human in-vivo experiments for two TES injection profiles.